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. and that is when they told me that they were going to name john as the sniper. >> that was also when they would argue that her ex-husband was out to murder her. and the 10 people that were just killed, that was just a cover. mill dread says john, allen muhammad was psychologically abusive to her. he december appeared with her three children. a judge issued a restraining order. mill dread moe hauhammad knew tf he saw her again, he would kill her. >> i think you would be surprised to know that other people have attacked you. >> they don't consider me or my children to be victims. there were people who said to me, or my face, or e-mail or letters, that if i would have stayed with john, he would have just killed me. >> after all you have been through, how do you cope with that kind of thing? >> people were expressing the emotions out of pain. and if they could not get to john, then the next person would be me. >> reporter: at first, mildred worked hard to protect her family's privacy. but as the years have passed, she has channelled her pain and hardship into hope. she started a nonprofit web site
? >> yes, exactly. we're taking your calls at 1-800-steph-1-2. we're going to be checking in with john fugelsang who is in manhattan. his power did not go out yesterday. but i guess everything south of time square everything lost power. >> you think about the weather and the actual impact of the storm, but i went through hurricane andrew in 1992 having grown up in miami, you go through a lot of these kinds of storms. when they are vicious like this there's really no way to prepare other than to hunker down and get your supplies in place. but you don't think about the downed trees and how long the power might be out. >> right. >> because the crews have to get to the sources, and that's difficult for them to do to restore power, and you think about the inconveniences of that. with andrew we were out of power for about three weeks, which is when it is really, really hot in miami people had to stay cool and in virginia where they have snow, you have to think about no heat. >> that's right. >> imagine that without any heat. >> a lot of buildings are heated with steam the
: major shakeup at apple. they will be looking for two senior executives. scott forestall and john broward are leaving this year. it's after digs appointing earnings and problems with problems with the mapping software. industry analysts say this move may have long term implications but unlikely to impact sales. we'll have to wait and see what it will have on apple stock going forward. >>> trading on wall street is suspended at least through tomorrow. first time u.s. markets have closed due to weather since 1985. suspension affects all trading markets including the pacific stock exchange. >> an oakland based international risk management firm is warning that sandy could set insurance loss records. those losses could be in the $5-10 billion range with uninsured losses soaring to as much as $20 billion. by comparison, hurricane irene caused $4 billion in uninsured losses this year. this is considerably more damaging. potential damage is new york city, it's harbor, 90-degree angle between long island and the coast making it unusually susceptible to flooding. >> we will continue to track storm
others during the storm. john nickels on the middle class heroes. >>> and chris christie praises the president and the federal government's response to the storm. while mitt romney is silent on his plans to privatize fema. we'll have the details. >>> and with one week before the election, what effect will the storm have on the campaign trail? i'll talk with political analyst richard wonderful. wolf. the capability of a pathfinder with the comfort of a sedan and create a next-gen s.u.v. with best-in-class fuel economy of 26 miles per gallon, highway, and best-in-class passenger roominess? yeah, that would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan pathfinder. it's our most innovative pathfinder ever. nissan. innovation that excites. ♪ that's the sound of car insurance companies these days. here a cheap, there a cheap, everywhere a cheap... you get it. so, what if instead of just a cheap choice, you could make a smart choice? like, esurance for example. they were born online and built to save people money from the beginning. it's what they've always done. not just something they che
responders who risked their lives to save others during the storm. john nickels on the middle class heroes. >>> and chris christie praises the president and the federal government's response to the storm. while mitt romney is silent on his plans to privatize fema. we'll have the details. >>> and with one week before the election, what effect will the storm have on the campaign trail? i'll talk with political analyst richard wolf. it's strange, i'm getting gray, but kate -- still looks like...kate. nice'n easy with colorblend technology gives expert highlights and lowlights. for color that's true to you. i don't know how she does it. with nice'n easy, all they see is you. >>> thanks for staying with us tonight. police and firefighters are working to get families out of the flooded neighbors tonight. rescue workers carried children to safety in little ferry just a few hours ago. hundreds of thousands of firefighters, police officers and nurses continue to work in harm's way tonight. they are members of america's middle class and they are the heroes in the wake of this storm. nearly 200 firef
by the name of john petit who said his house was built to with stand the hurricane and stayed on the second and third floor with his wife and they build a kitchenette for this reason and was not surprised by what he saw but his neighbor a different story. he had four feet of water in his house and was there yes cleaning up that mess. so, depending on who you met with or ran into on the streets, as you hop in the car and drive down the city streets, and you see people cleaning and you say hey you want to talk some sayyes and some say no and the stories are fascinating. >> we will hear more about the trip coming up. >>> also ahead this morning, the temperature right now droppingand many people in new york without power that is a scary situation. this morning, they are not just getting impatient but they are getting desperate. those living on staten island are pleading for help from elected officials. eye has been days since sandy slammed new york city. and people there are still begging for gasoline, food and clothing and now they don't know how much longer they can survive. >> we are going t
feyerick is on the south shore of long island and lyndon hurst. john berman is in lower manhattan. brian todd is covering rehoboth beach which is in delaware and sandra endo is still in maryland. we'll bring you updates from philadelphia mayor michael nutter, maryland governor martin o'malley, all of them will check in with us as well this morning. let's tell you where we are, lower manhattan, this is houston street. if you were to go down this way, you'd hit the fdr. if you were watching last night, the fdr drive flooded, very, very unusual. what we can see behind me, behind this downed branch, further back, is more flooding as we head down toward the fdr. much of the flooding in those evacuation zones. these apartment buildings behind me had been evacuated. evacuation zone. of course, flooding a big problem. the good news here it's actually receded a fair amount. the flooding where i was standing the water was coming up to here. it's back maybe 50 yards. so that's some good news. it's happening slowly and we're expecting as the day progresses that the water will go out and recede. up t
will be our guest. virginia governor bob mcdonnell. john berman is live in battery park, lower manhattan. expecting big storm surge there. rob marciano has the forecast but also is live in asbury park, new jersey. sandra endo is in ocean city in maryland. you've seen the deteriorating weather conditions there. george howell in kill devil hills, north carolina, on the outer banks. has for hours now. let's begin with rob marciano for the latest on what sandy is doing right now. when she is expected to make landfall, and how it will be all the way through. rob? >> good morning, again, soledad. the center of sandy is about 380 miles southeast of -- of new york city. the wind field expanding. we've got 800 miles of tropical storm force winds that will be battering this coastline. and just in the last hour, winds and rain have picked up here along the jersey shore. satellite pictures showed you just how immense this storm system is. second only to hurricane olga. but tied now with the 1938 historic hurricane, the long island express, as far as barometric pressure goes. historic event unfolding
in brooklyn and in lower manhattan as well. john berman is in battery park. got coastal flooding from hurricane irene. this time around it's expected to be significantly worse? >> significantly worse. they're saying the storm surge could be 6 to 11 feet higher. there was a study out of column brie ye bum bee yeah university saying had storm surge been 1 foot higher, it would have cost an additional $50 billion in damage. a storm surge 2 feet higher would come up to my knees, flood the subway system, the electrical grid. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks taking out power to 17,000 people. but it could be much higher than that. it's early calm, as it should be. people are staying in about 76 storm shelters where they've gone to hotels or to crash with friends. mayor michael bloomberg almost begged people to get out of their home. let's listen. >> i can't stress enough this is for your own safety. if you refuse to evacuate, you're not only putting yourself at risk but first responders who will have to assist you in an emergency. >> now, a
, known for picking winners. i went to franklin county, central part of the state with governor john kasich about his concerns. now we're in ham milton county, in cincinnati, ohio. voters in this election will come down yet again to one thing, the economy. >> if our government isn't leading by example then it doesn't set a good example for business to follow. bill: justin cooper runs the recycling business his great-grandfather started almost 90 years ago. his vote is all about his company. >> they said four for four years they will invest nor and more here at home and we haven't seen that. bill: cooper will vote for mitt romney. peggy shannon's cookie business is that rare example of a startup that is thrived in the great recession. after just two years, she is now moving to a larger building but the economy remains her concern. >> from a professional standard you think this is a pretty big investment. are we ever going to get our money back and i'm not sure actually but i think you have to have faith in the economy and faith in america. bill: she has a positive attitude during an e
points. in sunday the state's republican governor john kasich said romney has the momentum. >> i believe right now we are currently ahead. internals show us currently ahead. honestly think that romney's going to carry ohio and you know i haven't been saying this. i now believe it's going to happen. >> reporter: romney canceled a campaign event tomorrow in new hampshire. his campaign is not overly alarmed by all the cancelations because he's focusing instead >>> we are looking at dense fog around the bay area looking toward coit tower. the giant orange as the giants have won the world series. the fog is going to lift today. temperatures in the 40s and 50s. seeing delays at sfo for over an hour because of the fog. 70s, low 80s inland. and 60s coast side. next couple days looking nice. slight chance of showers on wednesday. >>> the approaching hurricane is forcing hundreds of thousands of traveler tos to change their plans. we'll show how long it could take for airline schedules to return to normal. >>> also, what you need to do if your flight has been canceled. >>> and for the
. >> on the screen, he's got dunkel with police. >> by the time he stepped in front of the camera john dunkel was old. and ready to put on a show. >> this is great. i had an urge to kill he took belmont police on a tour of his crime scene. >> and i killed him and placed his body on top of the mountain. do you want to just walk up the trail? >> he showed him where he stashed a murder weapon and seemed to get emotional, became annoyed by questions. >> what is going through your mind at the time? >> going through it. >> okay. >> belmont 1971 we never had a case close to this magnitude. it had the community locking their doors. disappeared from his home in the middle of the night. 12-year-old lance turner died near daytime soccer practice. 12-year-old sean dinel died in a sacramento park just after dark. police told media but they lackedtofdz make an arrest. their last resort paid off. >> when he moved to sacramento we planted a female detective in the fast food restaurant he was working in. >> she became his drinking buddy, wore a wire ask called for b whupe snuck into a home. e drunkel awaited trial on
to ask: siri... what happened to ive john forestall >>> apple is staying pretty tight-lipped act a sudden shakeup -- about a sudden shakeup at the top. but we knew who to ask about it. siri, what happened to apple executive john forstall? >> checking on that. would you like me to search the web for what happened to apple executive john forstall? >> actually, it's scott forstall, but she couldn't find it anyway. he headed up apple's mobile software unit. turns out siri didn't know where he went or happened. but the wall street journal reports he was asked to leave after refusing to own up to bugs in apple's new mapping service. and the company's new retail chief, john browett, is also gone after just five months on the job. he also presided over some missteps, most notably cutting hours at apple stories, a move the company acknowledged as a mistake. >>> a man who walked into the path of a light rail train never saw it coming. but he probably should have. cbs 5 reporter kiet do shows us it's just the latest example of a smartphone leading to a not- so-smart move. >> reporter: we arrived on
the water was. >> reporter: nearby john patricia says he was lucky. his house in the family for 52 years will only have to be gutted. >> unfortunately, that's just the way life is, you know? you have to accept it, and that's the end of it. >> reporter: elsewhere on the jersey shore, fires ignited by natural gas leaks destroyed more than a dozen homes. in bayhead, first responders drove through the flooded streets in a front-end loader look for stranded residents. others put on hip-waders to walk through town. some used canoes and kayaks. where it is safe to drive, there are long waits for gasoline. this line stretched more than a mile on the garden state pa parkway. back here in long beach island, scott, people who lived along the beach here did evacuate. when they return, they will have to decide whether to build so close to the waves. >> pelley: well, can chip, how long will it be before those folks can get back into those homes to see what they've lost? >> reporter: well, scott, we're told by the mayor of long beach island that it's going to be at least a week. it's going to take that
locations? what about voters who lost everything, including their photo i.d.? joe johns from washington joining me now. if anyone knows these questions, you do. do you think the election will be postponed ? what will happen in states like new jersey where many people are dealing with other things rather than worrying about getting to the polls? >> it's hard to say that an election like this will be postpone postponed. there are so many states in the united states that simply were not affected. and if you were to postpone for one state or two states, you would have what would be called an equal protection challenge and you could go to court and fight it. so, what's much more likely to happen, carol, is that the places that have problems -- we're talking about counties and specific precincts that have determined they have a problem. they'll do something to fix it, whether they'll move the polling place or there are some states that even have laws or rules where you can, you know, incrementally move the date or time, something along those lines. there are a lot of different options they ca
. >> on the screen is scott dunkel. >> by the time he stepped in front of the camera john dunkel was 25 years old and ready to put on a show. >> when i was in 6th grade i had an urge to kill. >> he took belmont police on a tour of his crime scenes. >> and i killed and placed his body -- >> did you want to take a step there or walk around? go ahead. >> he showed them where he stashed one of his murder weapons. he seemed to get emotional a couple times and became annoyed by the detective's questions. >> what was done here? >> i started in belmont in 1971. we never had a case that was even close to this magnitude. it really had the community locking their doors and wondering what was going on. >> 15-year-old john davies disappeared from his home in the middle of the night. 12-year-old lance turner disappeared from his shocker practice. sean danel disappeared after dark. and police suspected it him in each of the crimes. even told the media, but they lacked evidence to make an arrest. their last resort paid off. >> when he moved to sacramento we planted a female detective in the fast-food restaurant
dunkel. >> by the time he stepped in front of the camera john dunkel was 25 years old and ready to put on a show. >> when i was in 6th grade i had an urge to kill. >> he took belmont police on a tour of his crime scenes. >> and i killed and placed his body -- >> did you want to take a step there or walk around? go ahead. >> he showed them where he stashed one of his murder weapons. he seemed to get emotional a couple times and became annoyed by the detective's questions. >> what was done here? >> i started in belmont in 1971. we never had a case that was even close to this magnitude. it really had the community locking their doors and wondering what was going on. >> 15-year-old john davies disappeared from his home in the middle of the night. 12-year-old lance turner disappeared from his shocker practice. sean danel disappeared after dark. and police suspected it him in each of the crimes. even told the media, but they lacked evidence to make an arrest. their last resort paid off. >> when he moved to sacramento we planted a female detective in the fast-food restaurant he was working in
for one another, that's why we always bounce back from these kinds of disasters. >> let's bring in john nichols washington correspondent of "the nation" magazine and author of the book "uprising." the american middle class in this election cycle has been at the focal point of many conversations. this is the economic portion of america that's been asked to do more. this is the portion of america that has had their voices in the workplace attacked. their pensions cut. their wages sliced and yet we see when there is an emergency as what we are seeing with this storm, they step up and they are americans. what does it say about this country in the middle of this hot political debate that performances such as this are delivered by these americans? >> well, it's pretty inspiring, ed, and you're right, in many ways this year's election is a referendum on not just government. that's too vague a term. it's on the human infrastructure of public services in this country, the people who go out and make sure that when you go to sleep at night, and a storm is coming in, that that next morning you'll s
to the set with john bussey. we are looking at how the jobs we in the private sector are shaping up. gear shaping up to be the biggest gain since february, a very big and important move. if you get a paper paycheck, their name could be at bottom it, private sector numbers, obviously, and it is one that we obviously watched to predict what going on. they recently redid how they figures this out and trying to make it look like labor department numbers. >>shepard: the markets liked what it heard, we are up triple digits. >>gerri: the new york stock exchange c.e.o. trying to get everything back on track and they are using backup generators down this, so, having a few issues, traders still having trouble with cell phones internet access and we will see how it goes and hopefully it will be under control soon. >>shepard: i cannot keep my eyes off these photos coming in. this is in queens at the rockaways, eight or nine miles from that place at breezy point where the houses burned, the rockaways you may remember there was a bad plane crash william after the attacks of 9/11 when we were skittish a
have been working around the clock since sandy struck. abc's john schriffen spent the day with new york police search and rescue, in the air, on the water and on the ground, saving lives in the hardest-hit parts of the city. >> reporter: it's been five days since hurricane sandy made landfall. and from the sky to the sea, clear parts of new york city are still a mess. some areas are still flooded, buried in sand. just aren't there anymore. >> it's a little disturbing. a little heart wrenching. my neighborhood got hit hard also. >> reporter: to get a better idea of what new yorkers are going through, we followed the new york police department on a search and recovery mission. this was the scene tuesday, when the aviation team had to be lowered into the flood zones to rescue five adults and one child from the rooftops of their home. >> it was pretty daring. it was pretty intense. pretty stressful. but those guys pulled it off. >> reporter: we're now flying over staten island, the hardest of the five boroughs to get to. and the devastation is unimaginable. it almost looks like a wrecking b
. good morning, i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. we have a field of reporters covering the aftermath of sandy from every angle. rob marciano in new york city. dan lothian and paul steinhouser standing by in washington, d.c. and richard quest is also out there for us. >> with 1/3 of the people in new york city, 2 million people here without power. transportation is at a virtual standstill at a few time where few people have cars, not to mention the property and destux. 80 homes were consumed by fire in keeps. recovery from super storm sandy will be a mammoth job. rob marciano is in the chelsea neighborhood here in new york city. he is joining us live. rob, i was there live yesterday. what was amazing was the exodus of people coming out where it is black right now. many people moving uptown to find power, food and information. >> reporter: yeah, it is stunning. when you go from the typical lit northern manhattan area and come south of 30th street, it just goes completely dark. it is something i have never seen in new york city. the people, the differences in how people re
with. and, the election coming up next week. john, jenna. jenna: a lot to keep an eye on, janice. thank you. jon: there is this. brand new troubles for a storm-ravaged storm town in new jersey. new fires erupt in the same area where more than a dozen homes burned down when sandy pounded this affluent town. natural gas lines apparently fueling the flames. fire crews are having a tough time reaching the scene because the roads are nearly impasseable. jenna: we're getting brand new details as well on the massive fire that tore through breezy point, queens. you saw some of the footage already. it just boggles the mind. ravaging the blocks and blocks of homes on the barrier island this. is what is evident are. the six alarm fire, one. worst in new york city's history. burned more than 100 homes to the ground and damaged dozens of others. fire crews working nine plus hours to contain fast-moving flames. the tiny coastal neighborhood told to evacuate before sandy on fear of flooding. one report, not a single building, not a single building in the area was left unscathed, hit by storm surge the
than 70 stories up. it is right down the street from this building. john miller spoke with two city engineers who took on the dangerous task of making sure the crane doesn't fall to the street below. >> reporter: during the storm that snapped the boom off the crane with winds gusting through and swinging the hanging boom back and forth two new york city building department engineers had to get to the top of the building and answer the question would the boom hold or come crashing down? for most of the long climb the only way up was the stairs. >> i've never heard anything as loud as wind howling in my life as we got to the 48th floor and you have to apply so much pressure to open the door. i was with him. we got into the hallway and you could almost get sucked right out. >> reporter: michael and timothy had to check each of the structural braces that held the tower with the crane on top the side of the building. >> we were concerned about the upper most part. if that tie had failed that means the mast could fall. 1,000-foot mast. >> reporter: if the climb up was perilous it was noth
, john leopold where a tree fell through a kitchen and killed a man. the second death in maryland as a result of hurricane super storm sandy. thank you for your time today. >> you bet. >> this morning we are waking up to see what sandy has left behind for so many of us. >> downed trees and power lines, some have it worse than others. sherrie johnson continues our live team coverage live along the jfx. you are underneath the jfx, you are up chose and personal with the flood waters. >> reporter: you are absolutely right about. that i have to watch my stepment its not too far behind me here. you can hear the water. it is moving have swiftly and overflowing the banks here. this is the jones falls. we are underneath the jfx and in the hampton area where the flooding is taking place. it's overflowing in to the business park area, flooding the parking lots here. you have the athletic club and other businesses in the area, overflowing the banks going in to the parking lot area, this area is no stranger to flooding for the businesses. they have experienced problems from other storms becaus
better than someone who rode it out here in atlantic city. john is with us here. i'm assuming you and your wife maybe rode it out from a couple floors up. >> of course. kitchen, bedroom, floors,. >> reporter: -- everybody says get out, get out. people can't get in. >> there was a couple things. we have our own generator. we had power. we had the gas companies, always working. everything was working good and he -- there were things that happened during the storm that we were able to resolve because we were here like our sailboat that one of the sails got loose and if we weren't here our boats, our docks and everything would -- they would be out float in the bay. >> reporter: you said this wasn't as bad as you were thinking. >> you know for me. >> reporter: better yet. it could have been worse. >> i grew up in the 60s, 1962 we had a hurricane storm in atlantic city. you know, i lived through that. the water came up into the living room and we were three foot up off the ground. everything that you had here we had there. the ocean met the beach and -- the ocean met the bay in the
..../ the... 168-foot... john b. caddell... is a water tanker... that was moored about a mile off the beach. atlantic city's famous &pboardwalk is underwater after superstorr sandy.the torm left behinn massive amage.. includinn the boardwalk... which is in shhmbles.and overr in ssaside heights... you can homes... with their foundationssripped out. --- react to story --- 3&ptaal about stormm.. &p cooped up and riding out a storm.sandy kept people at into a boom for ne businnss. both he president and mitt romney to take time out for today. teacher: this is west virginia, pennsylvania, delaware. and this is maryland. every year marylanders spend five hundred and fifty million gaming at casinos in these other states. question seven will build a new casino and bring table games to baltimore... generating hundreds of millions for schools. and that money has to go to education. it's the law. so vote for question seven. so we can stop spending all that money here, and keep maryland money in classrooms like mine. i've always been lucky. flew 37 bombing missions over germany. made it home every
could it be? believe it or not, this guy thinks he has an idea. a researcher at johns hopkins, he's predicted how many of us may lose power. remember, irene left 7 million without power. >> our model suggest 10 million. >> reporter: roughly 10 million without power for a week or more. if 50 million feel the effect of this, 1 in 5, could be without electricity. a very big storm coming our way. >> that's an unbelievable number. >>> we'll go back out to sam champion in new york city, in preparations under way for how this city, the largest city in the country, would deal with hurricane sandy. >> bianna, you know, we have seen storms move up this coastline and breeze by new york. only one hurricane in recent memory irene made a move to this city and the city got ready for it. forecasters are being careful to let folks know right away that this storm has more strong effects than irene may have had. new york city is operating under a state of emergency and wants everyone prepared today for a monday storm. boarding up homes and buildings. >> i'm really nervous about this. i am. i'm cooki
back on in one small subdivision near cabin john. >> they must have been doing something right. >> reporter: david hogan is referring to pepco. >> i certainly give them the blame when things don't go right. so give them some credit this time. >> reporter: this is willard avenue in bethesda blocked by a fallen tree that brought down a utility pole, but the lights are still on. one driver forced to turn around was a restoration appraiser. >> most stuff were getting is fairly on the small side at the moment, but it's a mixture. i've not seen everything because i'm only one estimator in the company, but so far it's a lot of little stuff. >> reporter: in all more than four dozen roads in montgomery county were closed due to downed trees or power lines or floodwaters. county officials say we dodged a bullet, but some are still on edge. >> i'm worried the ground is really wet and there are lots of big trees. i'm afraid it will come down and then we'll still be out for five days like we usually are. >> have you come for a treat or for a trick? >> reporter: and while outdoor hallowe
and a chunk of new york city goes dark. john miller takes us along as the nypd responds to a historic emergency on "cbs this morning." halloween's here and we're at walmart with amanda talking about the walmart low price guarantee. that's your receipt from another store? you know it! let's put it to the test. butterfinger! nestle crunch! baby ruth! oh my gosh, i love candy! and if you find a lower advertised price they'll match it at the register. that means i can buy more! oh my, gosh! that's the walmart low price guarantee! see for yourself! bring in your last receipt and see how much you can save. save more on the candy your family loves with hauntingly low prices on all their nestle favorites. get more halloween for your money, guaranteed. walmart! ready or not, here i come! [ male announcer ] tim and richard smucker have always loved the taste of just-picked fruit. so it's no wonder why today smucker's makes the world's best jam. found ya! you always find me. you always hide here. [ male announcer ] with a name like smucker's it has to be good. when it comes to getting m
, john heilemann. willie is coming in the room right now. >> willie sort of sauntering in. >> he is. wow! got a lot of presidential polls to get to, and we will. >> i tell you what, important ones that really narrow the focus of this race. >> right. first we're going to start with the aftermath of sandy. the united states pledging quick relief for the millions of victims of the hurricanes. today president obama is scheduling to arrive in atlantic city to survey the damage alongside governor chris christie. this morning the associated press reports the storm killed at least 50 people. there are more than 8.2 million households still without power across 17 states. and many of the outages could last beyond election day. between damage to property and the economy, the total impact expected to reach a staggering $50 billion. the damage is perhaps nowhere worse than the coastline of new jersey where sandy came ashore laying waste to an amusement park and historic boardwalk at seaside heights. as for the airports, jfk, newark, they're expected to resume limited service this morning. the same c
's got a live report for us from bellevue. john's got a lack at some of the other stories making news this morning. good morning. >> this morning, people in breezy point in queens are literally picking up the pieces of their lives. at least 110 neighborhood homes the burned in that massive fire during sandy. new york governor andrew cuomo toured the devastation yesterday. he spoke to victims and promised them the tight-knit community will rebuild. >>> we have some new developments is on stories we've been following this morning. the university of southern california has lifted a lockdown it put in place following a late-night shooting at a campus halloween party. the school department of public safety says shots were fired. following an argument between two men last night at usc's main campus in los angeles. one of the men was critically wounded. another three people were also shot. their injuries, not life threatening. two suspects are now in custody. >>> on the road again, president obama and mitt romney return to the campaign trail today with just five days left until election day.
this morning. john berman is stationed there where the floodwaters came up very, very high. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, soledad. that's right. where i'm standing right now, last night was part of new york harbor. the floodwaters came in from the hudson river and the bay right behind me. it swept up and went about 30 feet back there. it would have been way past my waist. you can see where the water came in and flattened this garden area here, these bushes were standing up much higher before the water swamped them. the storm surge unprecedented. nearly 14 feet. that's feet higher than the record setback in 1960. out in new york harbor they saw waves 32 feet high if you can believe that. the storm surge unprecedented. this area also part of zone 80 evacuation zone, some 370,000 people told to get out of these low-lying areas specifically because of the storm surge that came. we're expecting another high tide after 9:00 a.m. this morning. we don't expect it to flood quite as badly but it is of concern. there is still expected to be a storm surge as you see this morning. and sole
domestic security team. that's john brennan. janet napolitano, and then of course chris fugate who is the head of fema but he was brought in as sort of -- he was jeb bush's head of emergency planning in florida during that period, if you recall, when florida went through four hurricanes. all of the other states didn't seem to do it and this guy was seen as nonpartisan super emergency management person, if you will. and that's the guy running fema. the president is getting constant updates. you've got to wait it out. you've got to find out a middle storm. and you're managing and brought everything in and waiting for the storm to pass to figure out, okay, how bad is the cleanup? right now it's just hunker down. >> hold on. we got an update. sandy is now a post tropical cyclone, still very powerful and expected to make landfall in one hour right near us. let me show you a picture. this is chris christie who is affected by this situation. he's speaking very positively of a democratic president. >> i thank the president for his telephone call inquiring about how things were going here a
. a researcher at johns hopkins, he's put together a model, predicting, how many of us may lose power. remember, irene left 7 million without power. >> our model suggesting 10 million. >> reporter: roughly 10 million without power for a week or more. if 50 million feel the effects of this, that's 1 in 5, could be without electricity. if you're inland, think again, it could be a bad one. dan and bianna. >> it will go well inland. david kerley, thank you for your reporting. >>> another breaking story we're watching closely. a massive earthquake off the west coast triggered a tsunami warning in hawaii. our worst fears quelled for now at least. on our affiliate reports. >> very serious situation in hawaii earl yi this evening. the civil service calling for a evacuation of the low-lying areas. caused by the 7.7 earthquake in canada. >> they're seeing the waves come in. it's still going to be a long night tonight. they'll have to wait at least a couple of more hours before they can consider lower that advisory. it appears that it's not going to be as bad as once predicted. >>> back out to sam, talk u
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